A Tour through My Crocheting Bag

Image

I have been crocheting for almost thirty years, and over the years I have discovered several tools that has made my crocheting experiences a lot easier. Today I have decided to talk about the tools I like to keep in my crocheting bag. These “crocheting gadgets” are not really required to finish my project usually, but they most certainly make my crocheting experience more fun and easier to enjoy. This post will be a little longer then usual because I want to spend a little time looking at each accessory. So bear with me a little. Keep in mind that I am only stating my opinion on each item and my preferences as how to use them.

Since we are talking about what I like to carry around with me, I thought I would talk about my wonderful crocheting bag first. (pictured above) It was a gift from my husband about eleven years ago and I would be lost without it. It measures 13″ by 14″ and 10″ deep making it a perfect fit for me, as well as strong and durable enough to tote around.

It has a big roomy center pocket to carry the projects in and on the outside six separate pockets to hold 6 skeins of yarn. When I am going to teach a class, I usually carry 5 skeins of yarn and one water bottle so I can grab this bag at any time and know it has everything in it. The best part is that the yarn feeds though the inside of the bag! This was the selling point for me. This way when I am done with my crocheting projects, I can now safely put my project into the center pocket and zip my bag and go. No more worry about losing something in an open bag and no more tangled yarn or having my yarn getting caught in the zipper.

Keeping everything in one spot has it advantages. I do not waste time looking for my supplies, because I only have one spot to look. Secondly, I do not lose supplies, I still have my original hooks from when I started crocheting when I was 20, and happily I have never bought a hook twice. I can say that this is partly because the bag enables me to keep everything in its place and when I am done crocheting, everything fits nicely inside the safety of my bag and this is convenient and easy for simple organization.

binder 5

Besides the 6 pockets for the yarn, there is a large inner pocket I always carry my current project and my pattern in. I also like to copy my pattern and place it into a plastic sleeve, like the kind you find easily in the school supply section of a Wal-Mart store. (pictured above) By doing this I do not have to carry my books around with me, which keeps them always looking nice and readable. I can also can use a dry erasable marker on the plastic sleeve making all the marks I like without actually marking up the original pattern. Then I erase the sleeve when I am done and throw the copy away.

Before I ramble on and forget, this was a bag we found on the Internet that we have long since forgotten who the company was we bought it from. It had the initials S.S. If any body recognizes it please let me know. I know several people who would love one, but I do not know where to send them or have seen a bag like it. It came in three different sizes and two different colors I received the medium size, and the dark green color.

Image

Now lets explore the inside of the bag. I have one inside zippered pocket. It goes along the one entire side in the interior. Although it is sewed to accommodate hooks, I keep pens here along with my a “Trim-A- Tool and Fringe Maker” accessory and a pair of scissors. (pictured abovef)

“Trim-A-Tool and Fringe Maker”: The Susan Bates® Trim Tool is a handy tool for creating fringe, tassels, and even rug yarn, quickly and easily, in uniform lengths that you control! This handy tool can be adjusted easily to make Fringe from 1½” to 15″ in length, Tassels from 3″ to 6″ in length, and Latch Hook Rug Yarn in the standard 2½” , or in the length you desire. (taken from the Susan Bates Web sight)

https://server25.lfchosting.com/yarncraft/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=4_15&products_id=49&zenid=ih7iupb2041cfgl40tehpmftm0

Scissors: I prefer small scissors, easier to carry. My friend, Linda, made a plastic canvas caring case for me to keep me from absent-mindedly poking myself reaching in the bag. I only use these scissors at the end of a project when I am weaving in my ends. These scissors never leave my bag and their sole purpose is for cutting yarn. This way I do not have to worry about them getting borrowed for another house hold use and being misplaced or damaged.

In the first side pocket I keep the following:

Image

“Lion Yarn” web sight had the hook organizer of my dreams and I bought it about two years ago. It is called the Lily Combo Needle Case. (pictured above) It is large enough to hold all sixty of my hooks, and still has room for more. It holds my regular hooks as well as my circular ones. The case also has enough room for my two gauges and a zippered pocket to hold the horizontal bars for my Hairpin Lace looms. Before this case I carried three cases for all my hooks, now I just have one. The only negative thing I can say about this item, is that when I open it I need to lay it on a flat surface or sometimes some of my hooks will slide out. But I never have this problem when it is closed.

http://www.lionbrand.com/6030/PictPage/1922244971.html

Image

I also keep size 30 and 50 knitting needles to help me crochet the Broomstick Lace and a 12 inch ruler in the side pocket with my Combo Needle Case. (pictured above)

ImageImage

Second Side Pocket, I keep a tupperware case that was designed for office use here and I keep the following in mine: (pictures above)

2013-04-02 14.39.22

The Clover Locking Stitch Markers and Susan Bates Stitch Holders (safety pin and round style). I prefer the locking stitch markers for two reasons: first they do not fall out as easy and they seem to last longer then the other ones I have used. The larger stitch holders I keep around for when I need to mark larger areas or when I need to mark several stitches at once. The round ones I like to use when I am using the double ended hook or the Tunisian Crochet hook.

2013-04-02 14.41.18

A yarn Cutter Pendant is one of my favorite pieces. (pictured above) It has a rotary cutting blade integrated inside the pendant. I love this item. I wear it around my neck so it is readily handy whenever I need it. I also keeps scissors out of reach of my preschool grandchildren. It also rids me of the problem of always losing my scissors under my chair cushion.

http://www.clover-usa.com/product/0/3106/_/Yarn_Cutter_PendantAntique_Silver

2013-04-02 14.39.47

Larger steel needles used for weaving yarn. (pictured above)

Safety pins, push pins and paper clips that I keep for use in my crocheting class.

2013-04-02 14.41.40

A Clover needle case where I keep my steel yarn needles for sewing in my ends. (pictured above)

buy-now-post-it-notes-150-p

I also keep post it, (pictured above) they are great for helping me keep track of where I am in my pattern. They can be moved as I progress, they stay in place when I am done for the day. And I can make notes on them if I need to. And if I need to give a student a note I always have paper.

AAAAC2pUi0AAAAAAALbA_A

Susan Bates Pom Pom maker which I am glad I do not make a lot of. (pictured above)

A strip of magnets for when I crochet refrigerator magnets.

A measuring tape for when I am crocheting clothing items.

latch-hook

A rug hook (pictured above) that I use when I am making fringe or need to pull several strings of yarn through an opening at once. I have found it is easier then using a hook because it contains the yarn making it easier to pull it through without losing some of it.

IMG_1514-1

The only thing I would suggest you keep around to help you (that I do not keep in my crocheting bag) are Crochet Stitch Dictionaries and Encyclopedias. (pictured above) I have completed a lot of patterns thanks to these books. Sometimes it just helps to read a special stitch two different ways.

I hope you enjoyed your tour through my crocheting bag. What are some of the things you like to keep handy for crocheting experience? Would love to hear from you.

Until next week, keep those hooks flying.

Advertisements

About crochetwithpassion

I have been certified through the Craft Yarn Council both in teaching and Instructor. I also have been teaching people to crochet for over fifteen years. This is what I will be doing through this blog. In the Crochet Master Class there are 18 projects. Some of the projects will be familiar to me such as Hairpin Lace; Tunisian Crochet; Filet Crochet; Double Ended Crochet; painted Crochet; Aran Crochet and Irish Crochet. However there are several in the book that are new and have peaked my interest and that includes the following: Woven Crochet; Tapestry Crochet; Entrelac Crochet; Fashion Crochet; Tassels; Bullion Stitch; Overlay Crochet; Bead Crochet; Bruges Crochet; Free-form crochet and Wire Crochet. Since Crocheting is a time consuming craft I will only be posting once a week. If you are like me and love to crochet but would really like to challenge yourself to go beyond what you are now doing, come along with me and move to the next level. Although the actual patterns will not be posted (copyright law) I will take you through each project and go through the process of each one. This is not a blog about free crochet patterns or selling crochet tools. What I would like to do is take you with me on the journey through this book as I learn and crochet each of 18 projects. I will attempt to crochet each project in the book, and in the process recording in detail my progress and the problems I encounter along the way and the process I went through to accomplish each project. I am hoping that you will not only learn from my experience but that it will inspire you to push yourself to the next phase in your crocheting skills. Until next time; keep those hooks flying.
This entry was posted in Crochet. Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to A Tour through My Crocheting Bag

  1. I did not realize how much I had in my bag till I started listing everything.

  2. LeeAnne says:

    Loved the tour Pamela. I really liked your idea of using the plastic sheets, most of my patterns come from the internet so they are printed pieces of paper, if I want to make a pattern more than once I have to scribble out my row count or remember where I am marking the next time I make it, using dry erase markers on the plastic sheets will be a great way to preserve my patterns thank you for the great post.

  3. LeeAnne, I am so glad you are finding some of my tips useful. I have found that my books last a lot longer also when I copy the pattern and use the plastic sheets. But a lot of people are like you and use the internet for most of their patterns. Glass cleaner will help your plastic to clean up good. Thanks for all the encoragement.

  4. Helen says:

    I really enjoyed reading this. Like you, I have been crocheting for years (almost 20), and have a substantial arsenal of items. This article is excellent for someone just starting out who needs to know where to start and what to start with. I would love to have had a resource such as this back when I got started. When I encounter people starting out, I will definitely recommend that they check out your blog. Thank you for taking the time to share.

    The Crochet Kitty

  5. Helen, Thank you so much for the encouraging words, and offering to share my blog. I was the first person in my family and circle of friends to learn to crochet; I also wished for resources like what people have today. All I had was a “Susan Bates Learn to Crochet” book. The internet has really made it possible to have a wealth of information at one’s finger tips. Thanks again, you comment really brighten my morning.

  6. Pingback: Take the Stress Out of Crocheting | Crochet With Passion

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s